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Queues, human intervention and checkout formalities are a thing of the past. Amazon doesn’t want the user to think twice, as one can only swipe the user code and handpick items from its newly conceptualized automated store.

Now, wouldn’t that heavily shake the Bureau of Labor Statistics that states that cashiers are the second-largest occupation, with 3.5 million employed in the U.S?

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Amazon says that what makes the store tick is a combination of computer vision, the aggregation of data from different sensors and machine learning. It calls the whole cocktail “Just Walk Out technology.”

http://www.seattletimes.com/business/amazon/amazoncom-unveils-self-driving-brick-and-mortar-convenience-store/

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrmMk1Myrxc&w=560&h=315]

It can tell, say, when a particular shopper picks up a carton of milk from a shelf, and the technology puts it in that shopper’s virtual cart. It can also tell when an item is put back on the shelf — and removes it from the virtual cart accordingly.

Shoppers walking into the store call up the Amazon Go app and hold their smartphone to a scanner as they would at an airport security line. That opens a gate. Then they just pick any combination of products and walk out. Amazon charges them after they leave the store.

Unlike the self-serve registers present at many supermarkets, there’s no need to stand in line or go through any register.

In the much longer term, if the experiment works out and is adopted widely, it could radically transform the nature of work in the retail industry, much like driverless car and truck technology threatens to upend transportation.

Another smart-thinker in Japan has launched a sensor-enabled grocery shopping basket in a store, which implies setting the bar higher with RFID tag on groceries. Once the customer’s payment is processed, it opens up and the groceries seamlessly fall into the bag.

https://www.facebook.com/businessinsider/videos/710400065825019/

As technology continues to advance at a startling rate, logistics is perhaps one of the industries that must adapt the most quickly. If this seems surprising, consider that all the world’s most innovative products and services at some point require storage and transportation over great distances, within short time periods.

IAM Robotics is currently developing a mobile robot with an arm on top and a camera system that can navigate an existing warehouse and pick items from shelves and place them into an order tote. The system was field tested in a warehouse where it was able to pick test orders from 40 items that it had never seen before.

The robot will be tested in a more general goods warehouse where it will be integrated with a warehouse management system (WMS) for the first time and pick live orders. IAM Robotics hopes to have a commercial version of its system available sometime in 2016.

The robot uses a 3D depth camera to identify items to be picked. The company has its own software that allows the machine to recognize certain objects and know where to grasp the product, says Tom Galluzzo, CEO. The first deployment will be in a pharmaceutical distributor, but Galluzzo sees “tremendous” application to the food industry, especially e-commerce fulfillment.

IAM Robotics is currently developing a mobile robot with an arm on top and a camera system that can navigate an existing warehouse and pick items from shelves and place them into an order tote. The system was field tested in a warehouse where it was able to pick test orders from 40 items that it had never seen before.

The robot will be tested in a more general goods warehouse where it will be integrated with a warehouse management system (WMS) for the first time and pick live orders. IAM Robotics hopes to have a commercial version of its system available sometime in 2016.

The robot uses a 3D depth camera to identify items to be picked. The company has its own software that allows the machine to recognize certain objects and know where to grasp the product, says Tom Galluzzo, CEO. The first deployment will be in a pharmaceutical distributor, but Galluzzo sees “tremendous” application to the food industry, especially e-commerce fulfillment.

IAM Robotics is currently developing a mobile robot with an arm on top and a camera system that can navigate an existing warehouse and pick items from shelves and place them into an order tote. The system was field tested in a warehouse where it was able to pick test orders from 40 items that it had never seen before.

The robot will be tested in a more general goods warehouse where it will be integrated with a warehouse management system (WMS) for the first time and pick live orders. IAM Robotics hopes to have a commercial version of its system available sometime in 2016.

The robot uses a 3D depth camera to identify items to be picked. The company has its own software that allows the machine to recognize certain objects and know where to grasp the product, says Tom Galluzzo, CEO. The first deployment will be in a pharmaceutical distributor, but Galluzzo sees “tremendous” application to the food industry, especially e-commerce fulfillment.

Operational Changes in Today’s Economy 

In the current economy, budgets have slimmed, labor has been reduced, and customers are more and more demanding. Staying in shape during a recession allows businesses to become increasingly savvy and operationally fit. Organizations who maintain a smooth cadence within the 5 Rights of Logistics will weather the storm.

IT changes are good investments in tough times. Part of becoming ‘operationally fit’ involves the task of improving the speed and accuracy of the process itself. Without the proper tools, the information going in to the organization may negatively affect the output. The right WMS, coupled with an automated shipping management solution, can provide an almost immediate return on investment and enable organizations to not only save money on labor and transportation costs, but also enable them to provide real-time communication to their customers with advance shipment notification.

There are countless benefits tied to upgrading or improving systems management. However, survey research indicates that while the majority of companies agree they could improve and streamline their infrastructure, most have not changed or improved their technology even though it could reduce the time they spend on activities (like carrier selection) by nearly three-quarters. What many do not realize is that most manual processes today, although familiar, are often more costly ways of doing business.

The retailers, e-tailers, distributors and manufacturers need and are bound to move at the speed of sound.

Having evolved from this =>

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to this,

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back in the 1970’s, if you wanted to use a computer you had to use the command line interface, which looked like this:

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You couldn’t buy a computer with graphics, icons, buttons, or a mouse. They didn’t commercially exist then. To get the computer to do what you wanted, you had to speak to it in a computer programming language.

Then in 1981, a group of computer scientists at Xerox PARC developed and launched the Xerox Star—a personal computer with the very first graphical user interface (GUI).

It used windows, icons, drop-down menus, radio buttons, and checkboxes. It allowed users to open, move and delete files.

 

It might not look like much compared to what’s available today. But, in the early stages of the personal computing era, the GUI was a revolution. It meant you no longer had to rely on writing code to use a computer, hence making it far more accessible to the masses.

The teams at Apple Computer continued to develop and expand on the idea of the GUI. In 1984, they released the Macintosh, which was the first commercially successful desktop computer to use an interface with multiple windows and a point-and-click mouse.

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The advent of the GUI introduced the need for a new breed of designer—one who was focused on the graphical interface of a personal computer. And that’s when the UI designer stepped onto the scene.

This discipline has evolved over the last few decades, and it’s going to continue to evolve in the future.

UI designers today are working on websites, apps, wearables, and other programs. They may be responsible for things like designing the layout of a digital product’s interface and the visual elements on all the pages or screens of the system.

Following the footsteps of the tech-giants who gave way to all sized-computers, Apple’s “touch user interface” to Amazon’s automated stores, IAM Robotics is currently developing a mobile robot with an arm on top and a camera system that can navigate an existing warehouse and pick items from shelves and place them into an order tote. The system was field tested in a warehouse where it was able to pick test orders from 40 items that it had never seen before.

The robot will be tested in a more general goods warehouse where it will be integrated with a warehouse management system (WMS) for the first time and pick live orders. IAM Robotics hopes to have a commercial version of its system available sometime in 2016.

The robot uses a 3D depth camera to identify items to be picked. The company has its own software that allows the machine to recognize certain objects and know where to grasp the product, says Tom Galluzzo, CEO. The first deployment will be in a pharmaceutical distributor, but Galluzzo sees “tremendous” application to the food industry, especially e-commerce fulfillment.

The logistics industry must evaluate the cost-efficiencies of smart movement, energy saving, cost-cutting-employee reduction and ultimately the improbable fears of automation.

(Curated by Sana Husain, Corporate Analyst, Jayem Logistics)